Some Basics For Becoming A Good Parent

Each child is unique, much like a snowflake. Children have their own likes and dislikes, temper or calmness, and you need to adjust your parenting style to work with their listening style. Here are some ideas given to us by parents who have raised their children and survived.

Don’t come up with a “one size fits all” idea of discipline. When disciplining your children, realize that they all respond differently to correction. While a time-out might be what one child needs in order to comply, that same method might not work for another. Find what each child responds best to: time-outs, confiscating toys, or extra chores, and then run with that.

A critical parenting tip is to never allow a toddler to be near water, unattended. Bathtubs, pools, lakes and any other areas of significant water, can pose extreme danger to small children. By ensuring that young kids are never alone in such settings, the risk of accidental drowning can be drastically lowered.

Make sure you don’t overload your child with work. Too many parents keep piling work onto young children and they overload them. Make sure your child has time to play and just relax. It’s important to balance work and play, especially when your child is just starting school. It’s too easy to ask too much of them at once.

If you have more than one child, it is important that you pay the same amount of attention to all of them, no matter what their ages are. You do not want one child to be neglected– this could cause them to show resentment toward you when they get older.

We all know that engaging in an argument with a toddler is never the most productive use of our time. To avoid arguments, make sure you explain your reasons for your rules in ways that are easy for your toddler to understand, and decide ahead of time which rules are flexible and which are non-negotiable.

Getting into an argument with your child is never fun, and when emotions are flying high, it can be easy to lose your cool and say things that you regret. When you feel yourself getting very upset, give yourself permission to take a time out. Walk out of the room, take a short walk, read a book – give yourself a chance to calm down.

Develop a support network of people you can call for help with breastfeeding. The early days after giving birth are stressful and tiring. It is very tempting to just get a bottle and hope it works when things start going wrong. If you have a strong support system in place ,you will be able to contact them for advice and support. That support will make you less likely to give up and go for the bottle.

Your children are precious, but aren’t really like a snowflake. They won’t melt if you do the wrong thing, so feel free to experiment with your parenting style until you find something that works. Kids are amazingly resilient, so supply lots of hugs and kisses when things do go wrong and everything will be okay in the end!